2018 Charities

2018

RuDASA believes that the long term solution for rural health care in South Africa is adequate and appropriate training of South Africans to meet the needs for health care professionals in underserved rural areas. We are involved in a number of initiatives to lobby for and address these needs. (See elsewhere on this site, including scholarship schemes and electives programmes). We also support the principle of the Melbourne Manifesto with respect to the need for a Code to govern the International Recruitment of Health Care Professionals. Within this context, it is obvious that we in South Africa will remain reliant on the services of foreign qualified doctors to staff our rural health services for many years to come.


2017

Just Footprints Foundation believes in providing equal employment opportunity and does not discriminate against its employees, volunteers or applicants because of race, colour, religion, sex, disability, national origin, age, marital status, sexual preference or orientation, medical condition, or any other legally protected class or status.


Surgeons for Little Lives is run by a small group of Paediatric Surgeons, and ordinary people, passionate about uplifting the lives of less fortunate children needing life changing surgery.

It was started with the overriding objective of raising the level of care given to patients in the Paediatric Surgery wards in state hospitals, in the Greater Gauteng area, to world class standards.


2016

CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation was established in 1979 as a support group to parents of children with cancer, by parents of children with cancer. Having experienced the immense emotional and financial toll that cancer takes they recognised there is more than one victim in the family of the child with cancer. Their aim was to ease the burden on parents facing the same journey by providing access to relevant, accurate information, as well as emotional and practical support..


2015

STEPS Charity NPC is a national and regional non-profit organisation and social enterprise working for the eradication of clubfoot as a disability in southern and east Africa. Their story started in 2003 with the birth of a boy with clubfoot in South Africa.After successful treatment by Dr Ponseti in Iowa, Karen Moss returned home and told the story of her son’s successful treatment to local doctors. Karen founded STEPS in 2005 to introduce and promote the Ponseti Method of clubfoot treatment in Southern Africa and support families going through the process..